Pictured above is Charlotte, North Carolina. The Charlotte School of Law recently received some positive news from the Department of Education.

The Charlotte School of Law received some good news on July 27th when the U.S. Department of Education ruled that the school will continue to receive federal financial aid for the upcoming academic year.

The Department of Education notified the Charlotte law school on Thursday, the 27th, that the department was prepared to reinstate federal student loan funding, effective for the looming fall semester.

Charlotte Law Dean Paul Megget released the following statement regarding the Department of Education’s decision: “We are excited at the prospect of being able to help our students complete their education. In the meantime, [Charlotte Law] continues to work closely with the American Bar Association and the UNC Board of Governors to resolve all remaining compliance-related matters.”

The Charlotte School of Law has had their fair-share of bad publicity in recent times. In October, the American Bar Association (ABA) placed the Charlotte School of Law on probation. Not soon after, the U.S. Department of Education revealed that the embattled law school would lose all federal financial aid after discovering that the law school was severely misrepresenting its compliance with ABA accreditation standards to students of the law school.

Many saw the decision by the Education Department as a kiss of death for the Charlotte School of Law because it is quite hard for law students to attend law school without substantial financial aid. After the Education Department’s decision, the ABA ordered the law school to develop a plan that would properly prepare both the school and the students for the eventual closing of the law institution.

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Further, the North Carolina Board of Governors came to the conclusion that the Charlotte School of Law was not in compliance with the state’s standards for financial resources, planning, or stability. That decision was handed down to the school this summer. As per regulations, the Charlotte School of Law is now required to draft a plan that will improve the school’s performance. The plan must be ABA-approved and must be submitted no later than August 10th.

Margaret Spellings, the president of the University of North Carolina system, and the UNC Board of Governors are not entirely positive that Charlotte Law’s plan will pass. Questions abound on whether or not the Charlotte School of Law is financially secure enough to progress and if the law school even has enough time to draft a plan that could be approved and implemented.

Despite that, the Charlotte School of Law remains confident that they will pass and continue on as a law institution. The school released the following statement regarding the procedures: “While the Board found that CSL was not in compliance with certain financial requirements contained in the Standards, it also continued our license in force and allowed additional time for the school to take measures to strengthen its financial position.”

The recent ruling by the Department of Education has put all the predictions of impending doom on hold. The ABA has deferred the phase-out plan, while students that were planning on attending Charlotte Law this fall have received a second disbursement of federal financial aid.

Image Copyright © John Ashley